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RNA News (42 articles)



Smallest and fastest-known RNA switches provide new drug targets

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—A University of Michigan biophysical chemist and his colleagues have discovered the smallest and fastest-known molecular switches made of RNA, the chemical cousin of DNA. The researchers say these rare, fleeting structures are prime targets for the development of new...

Published on 8 October 2012, 03:37


Common RNA Pathway Found in ALS and Dementia

Two proteins previously found to contribute to ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, have divergent roles.  But a new study, led by researchers at the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, shows that a common...

Published on 1 October 2012, 14:36


Researchers achieve RNA interference, in a lighter package

Pared-down nucleic acid nanoparticle poses less risk of side effects, offers better targeting.Cambridge, MASS. -- Using a technique known as “nucleic acid origami,” chemical engineers have built tiny particles made out of DNA and RNA that can deliver snippets of RNA directly to tumors,...

Published on 4 June 2012, 10:36


Antisense Oligonucleotides Make Sense in Myotonic Dystrophy

HOUSTON -- Antisense oligonucleotides – short segments of genetic material designed to target specific areas of a gene or chromosome – that activated an enzyme to "chew up" toxic RNA (ribonucleic acid) could point the way to a treatment for a degenerative muscle disease called myotonic...

Published on 28 February 2012, 06:54


Intruder Detected: Raise The Alarm! How a molecular switch activates the anti-viral innate immune response

When a thief breaks into a bank vault, sensors are activated and the alarm is raised. Cells have their own early-warning system for intruders, and scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Grenoble, France, have discovered how a particular protein sounds that alarm...

Published on 14 October 2011, 04:37


New mechanism in the regulation of human genes

Neuherberg-- In order to create proteins, the protein-coding gene must be transcribed into RNA and in the so-called splicing* process shortened to the correct template. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and Munich’s Technical University have now discovered how the U2AF protein...

Published on 14 July 2011, 04:03


Yale Scientists Find That Genes Have Help in Determining Our Traits

New Haven, Conn. — For decades, biology textbooks have been clear – our traits are the product of our genes. But a new study by Yale University researchers published Dec. 26 in Nature Genetics suggests another mechanism can regulate variations of traits even in genetically identical...

Published on 26 December 2010, 14:51


New 3-D model of RNA 'core domain' of enzyme telomerase may offer clues to cancer, aging

Telomerase is an enzyme that maintains the DNA at the ends of our chromosomes, known as telomeres. In the absence of telomerase activity, every time our cells divide, our telomeres get shorter. This is part of the natural aging process, as most cells in the human body do not have much active...

Published on 3 November 2010, 17:14


A Mystery Solved: How Genes Are Selectively Silenced

Cells have to use their resources economically. Therefore, they read only those genes which are needed at a given moment, while the others are chemically labeled and, thus, selectively turned off. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) have...

Published on 18 October 2010, 09:32


Cancer-associated long non-coding RNA regulates pre-mRNA splicing

CHAMPAIGN, lll. — Researchers report this month that MALAT1, a long non-coding RNA that is implicated in certain cancers, regulates pre-mRNA splicing – a critical step in the earliest stage of protein production. Their study appears in the journal Molecular Cell.Nearly 5 percent of the...

Published on 23 September 2010, 15:32


Caltech Scientists Create New Process to "Program" Cancer Cell Death

PASADENA, Calif.—Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have engineered a fundamentally new approach to killing cancer cells. The process—developed by Niles Pierce, associate professor of applied and computational mathematics and bioengineering at Caltech, and his...

Published on 6 September 2010, 15:01


UCLA scientists discover protein that shuttles RNA into cell mitochondria

Finding could yield new approach to fighting cancer, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.In a new study, UCLA researchers have uncovered the role played by an essential cell protein called polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPASE) in shuttling RNA into the mitochondria, the energy-producing...

Published on 9 August 2010, 14:27


NIH-Supported Finding on Cocaine Addiction: Tiny Molecule, Big Promise

Discovery could lead to better ways of predicting drug abuse risk and treating addictions.A specific and remarkably small fragment of RNA appears to protect rats against cocaine addiction—and may also protect humans, according to a recent study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse...

Published on 7 July 2010, 15:58


McGill Team Discovers a Piece of the Puzzle for Individualized Cancer Therapy Via Gene Silencing

In a major cancer-research breakthrough, researchers at the McGill University, Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a small segment of a protein that interacts with RNA can control the normal expression of genes - including those that are active in cancer. The research, published...

Published on 26 May 2010, 16:24


MicroRNA and Host Gene Play Key Role in Regulating Cholesterol Pathways

Study identifies potential new strategy for raising "good" cholesterol levels.Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have identified tiny segments of RNA that may play an important role in the body's regulation of cholesterol and lipids. Their study found that the miR-33 family of...

Published on 13 May 2010, 15:53


New Theory Of Down Syndrome Cause May Lead To New Therapies

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Conventional wisdom among scientists for years has suggested that because individuals with Down syndrome have an extra chromosome, the disorder most likely results from the presence of too many genes or proteins contained in that additional structure.But a recent study...

Published on 23 March 2010, 16:30


Secret To Healing Chronic Wounds Might Lie In Tiny Pieces Of Silent RNA

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Scientists have determined that chronic wounds might have trouble healing because of the actions of a tiny piece of a molecular structure in cells known as RNA.The Ohio State University researchers discovered in a new animal study that this RNA segment in wounds with limited...

Published on 22 March 2010, 17:01


Researchers Trace Effects Of Genetic Defect In Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

Research on the genetic defect that causes myotonic muscular dystrophy has revealed that the mutation disrupts an array of metabolic pathways in muscle cells through its effects on two key proteins. A study published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology shows that the loss of a single...

Published on 25 January 2010, 11:53


New RNA interference technique can silence up to five genes

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Researchers at MIT and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals report this week that they have successfully used RNA interference to turn off multiple genes in the livers of mice, an advance that could lead to new treatments for diseases of the liver and other organs.Since the 1998 discovery...

Published on 29 December 2009, 08:16


Tiny RNA Has Big Impact On Lung Cancer Tumors

New Haven, Conn. — Researchers from Yale University and Mirna Therapeutics, Inc., reversed the growth of lung tumors in mice using a naturally occurring tumor suppressor microRNA. The study reveals that a tiny bit of RNA may one day play a big role in cancer treatment, and provides hope for...

Published on 7 December 2009, 08:59


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