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Marine Biology News (13 articles)



Rapid Coral Death By a Deadly Chain Reaction

Soil erosion in tropical coastal areas accelerates coral death.Most people are fascinated by the colourful and exotic coral reefs, which form habitats with probably the largest biodiversity. But human civilisation is the top danger to these fragile ecosystems through climate change, oxygen...

Published on 23 May 2012, 13:46


Scientists Film Hagfish Anti-Shark Slime Weapon

The hagfish found in New Zealand’s deepest waters is grotesque enough, thanks to its scary protruding teeth straight from a horror film.  Now, scientists have witnessed the full power of its other gruesome feature – a built-in slime weapon to deter predators such as sharks, making it...

Published on 27 October 2011, 06:21


Scientists Discover Source of Essential Nutrients for Open-Ocean Algae

Algae obtain nitrate from deep waters 250 meters beneath the surface.For almost three decades, oceanographers have been puzzled by the ability of microscopic algae ("microalgae") to grow in open-ocean areas where there is very little nitrate, an essential nutrient for the algae.In this...

Published on 23 June 2010, 13:51


Mystery Solved: Marine Microbe Is Source of Rare Nutrient

A new study of microscopic marine microbes, called phytoplankton, by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the University of South Carolina has solved a ten-year-old mystery about the source of an essential nutrient in the ocean.Roughly a decade ago scientists discovered...

Published on 29 September 2009, 15:43


Squid’s bioluminescence comes from eye-related genes

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) –– Scientists have found that a small Hawaiian squid can hide itself by using an organ with the same genes found in its eye.Using a process called bioluminescence, the squid can light up its underside to match the surrounding light from the sun. This disguises...

Published on 12 June 2009, 18:12


Coral reef real estate collapsing in Caribbean

Climate change is eating coral-reef fish out of house and home in the Caribbean. Its role in flattening coral reefs is reducing the region’s biodiversity and increasing its susceptibility to coastal erosion and flooding. SFU biologists Lorenzo Alvarez-Filip, Nick Dulvy and Isabelle...

Published on 10 June 2009, 17:45


Gene study may help solve Sydney rock oyster mystery

A study of oyster genetics is helping scientists better understand the mysterious QX-disease, which has been responsible in the past for killing Sydney rock oysters in the Georges and Hawkesbury Rivers.Scientists already believe that QX-disease affects oysters that are under some form of acute...

Published on 9 June 2009, 04:43


Corals' "Internal Communication" Process Critical to Maintaining Healthy Reefs

Disruptions causing decline of coral reefs around the world.Corals, it appears, have a genetic complexity that rivals that of humans, have sophisticated systems of biological communication that are being stressed by global change, and are only able to survive based on proper function of an...

Published on 28 May 2009, 18:07


Fisheries needs inclusion in climate change debate

Global fisheries must be included in the ongoing debate on how the world’s most vulnerable populations can adapt to climate change, says a Simon Fraser University biologist. Nick Dulvy, who holds a Canada Research Chair in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, makes the argument in a...

Published on 28 May 2009, 15:22


Habitat loss killing fish

Four Simon Fraser University researchers say the findings of an international marine study they co-authored with more than 30 other scientists sounds an alarm bell for marine life globally.SFU tropical marine ecologist Isabelle Côté, fish conservation ecologist John Reynolds and...

Published on 3 April 2009, 04:53


Scripps Scientists Help Decode Mysterious Green Glow of the Sea

Dual purpose discovered for worm's brilliant bioluminescent light - Scripps Institution of Oceanography / University of California, San DiegoMany longtime sailors have been mesmerized by the dazzling displays of green light often seen below the ocean surface in tropical seas. Now researchers...

Published on 1 April 2009, 12:18


Researchers solve mystery of deep-sea fish with tubular eyes and transparent head

The barreleye (Macropinna microstoma) has extremely light-sensitive eyes that can rotate within a transparent, fluid-filled shield on its head. The fish's tubular eyes are capped by bright green lenses. The eyes point upward...

Published on 23 February 2009, 14:01


Seamounts may serve as refuges for deep-sea animals that struggle to survive elsewhere

Over the last two decades, marine biologists have discovered lush forests of deep-sea corals and sponges growing on seamounts (underwater mountains) offshore of the California coast. It has generally been assumed that many of these animals live only on seamounts, and are found nowhere else....

Published on 11 February 2009, 15:44


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