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Biomedical engineering News (28 articles)



New Composite Material May Restore Damaged Soft Tissue

Potential uses include facial reconstruction for soldiers’ blast injuries.Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins have developed a new liquid material that in early experiments in rats and humans shows promise in restoring damaged soft tissue relatively safely and durably. The material, a...

Published on 2 August 2011, 15:01


In Vitro Pregnancy Rates Improve With New Device That Mimics Motions In The Body

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Gently rocking embryos while they grow during in vitro fertilization (IVF) improves pregnancy rates in mice by 22 percent, new University of Michigan research shows. The procedure could one day lead to significantly higher IVF success rates in humans.Researchers built a device...

Published on 18 January 2010, 15:33


On new lab chip, heart cells display a behavior-guiding ‘nanosense’

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers, working with colleagues in Korea, have produced a laboratory chip with nanoscopic grooves and ridges capable of growing cardiac tissue that more closely resembles natural heart muscle. Surprisingly, heart cells cultured in this way used a “nanosense” to...

Published on 15 December 2009, 12:22


Scientists Guide Immune Cells with Light and Microparticles

New Haven, Conn. — A team led by Yale University scientists has developed a new approach to studying how immune cells chase down bacteria in our bodies. Their findings are described in the November 15 issue of Nature Methods Advanced Online Publication.When bacteria enter our bodies they...

Published on 16 November 2009, 06:38


New Device Finds Early Signs of Eye Disease in Preemies

Tell-tale signs of a condition that can blind premature babies are being seen for the first time using a new handheld device in a study at Duke University Medical Center.The technology, developed in part by Duke biomedical engineers, uses spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) to...

Published on 21 September 2009, 15:13


New MRI technique could mean fewer breast biopsies in high-risk women

A University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineer and colleagues have developed a method that, applied in MRI scans of the breast, could spare some women with increased breast cancer risk the pain and stress of having to endure a biopsy of a questionable lump or lesion.The universal...

Published on 29 June 2009, 10:17


Ultra-sensitive detector promises improved treatment of viral respiratory infections

A Vanderbilt chemist and a biomedical engineer have teamed up to develop a respiratory virus detector that is sensitive enough to detect an infection at an early stage, takes only a few minutes to return a result and is simple enough to be performed in a pediatrician’s office.Writing in The...

Published on 26 June 2009, 17:26


Slicing chromosomes leads to new insights into cell division

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—By using ultrafast laser pulses to slice off pieces of chromosomes and observe how the chromosomes behave, biomedical engineers at the University of Michigan have gained pivotal insights into mitosis, the process of cell division.Their findings could help scientists better...

Published on 29 May 2009, 09:55


A guide to the invisible: UGA biomedical engineer publishes on "super-resolution" video imaging

Athens, Ga. – A crucial tool in the evolution of scientific capability in bioscience, the fluorescence microscope has allowed a generation of scientists to study the properties of proteins inside cells. Yet as human capacity for discovery has zoomed to the nanoscale, fluorescence microscopy...

Published on 6 May 2009, 08:34


Using Combinatorial Libraries to Engineer Genetic Circuits Advances Synthetic Biology

(Boston) -- Streamlining the construction of synthetic gene networks has led a team of Boston University researchers to develop a technique that couples libraries of diversified components with computer modeling to guide predictable gene network construction without the back and forth tweaking....

Published on 22 April 2009, 11:14


Researches Use Brain Interface To Post To Twitter

MADISON - In early April, Adam Wilson posted a status update on the social networking Web site Twitter - just by thinking about it.Just 23 characters long, his message, "using EEG to send tweet," demonstrates a natural, manageable way in which "locked-in" patients can couple...

Published on 20 April 2009, 09:38


Findings show insulin - not genes - linked to obesity

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Fat storage in cells Download photo caption below Researchers have uncovered new evidence suggesting factors other than genes could cause obesity, finding that genetically identical cells store widely differing amounts of fat...

Published on 14 April 2009, 11:27


Nanotech coating could lead to better brain implants to treat diseases

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Biomedical and materials engineers at the University of Michigan have developed a nanotech coating for brain implants that helps the devices operate longer and could improve treatment for deafness, paralysis, blindness, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease.Currently, brain...

Published on 10 March 2009, 13:27


New gel offers controlled drug delivery

Self-assembling hydrogel could help treat cancer and diabetes, among other diseasesMIT researchers have demonstrated that a gel composed of small, woven protein fragments can successfully carry and release proteins of different sizes, potentially enabling delivery of drugs such as insulin and...

Published on 9 March 2009, 16:16


Engineered viruses can help fight antibiotic resistance

Viruses attack bacterial defensesA new approach to fighting bacterial infections, developed at MIT and Boston University, could help prevent bacteria from developing antibiotic resistance and help kill those that have already become resistant.Researchers from both schools have engineered a virus...

Published on 2 March 2009, 19:42


Optical Techniques Show Continued Promise in Detecting Pancreatic Cancer

Vadim Backman EVANSTON, Ill. --- Optical technology developed by a Northwestern University professor of biomedical engineering has been shown to be effective in detecting the presence of pancreatic cancer through...

Published on 2 March 2009, 12:33


Spun-sugar fibers spawn sweet technique for nerve repair

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Scaffold of tiny synthetic tubes Download image caption below Researchers at Purdue University have developed a technique using spun-sugar filaments to create a scaffold of tiny synthetic tubes that might serve as...

Published on 26 February 2009, 14:53


Vanderbilt scientists invent world's smallest periscopes

A team of Vanderbilt scientists have invented the world’s smallest version of the periscope and are using it to look at cells and other micro-organisms from several sides at once.“With an off-the-shelf laboratory microscope you only see cells from one side, the top,” says team...

Published on 25 February 2009, 18:49


New findings measure precise impact of fat on cancer spread

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Lipid-rich cancer cells Download image caption below Researchers at Purdue University have precisely measured the impact of a high-fat diet on the spread of cancer, finding that excessive dietary fat caused a 300 percent...

Published on 25 February 2009, 15:46


Nanoscopic Changes to Pancreatic Cells Reveal Cancer

Vadim Backman Photo by Sam Levitan EVANSTON, Ill. --- A team of researchers led by a Northwestern University biomedical engineer has developed a way to examine cell biopsies and detect never-before-seen signs of...

Published on 24 February 2009, 12:45


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